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Monday, July 13, 2020 | History

3 edition of Humanitarian intervention and the pursuit of justice found in the catalog.

Humanitarian intervention and the pursuit of justice

Humanitarian intervention and the pursuit of justice

a Pax Christi contribution to a contemporary debate

  • 3 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by Kok Pharos in Kampen, The Netherlands .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Intervention (International law),
  • Human rights.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementB. Wicker & F. van Iersel, eds.
    ContributionsWicker, Brian, 1929-, Iersel, Fred van, 1954-, Pax Christi.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsKZ6369 .H86 1995
    The Physical Object
    Pagination119 p. ;
    Number of Pages119
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL919921M
    ISBN 109039004315
    LC Control Number95217426
    OCLC/WorldCa34902288

    In what ways the rights of humanitarian intervention constitute a threat to the bases of international order, and how this affects the position of an individual in international society The extent to which humanitarian intervention questions the conventional assumption that international solidarity and the pursuit of Author: Tonny Brems Knudsen.   Francis Abiew has defined humanitarian intervention in a way akin to that of Murphy: ‘humanitarian intervention, understood in the classical sense, involves forcible self-help by a state or group of states to protect human rights’. 68 Pressing this line of argument to its limits, Mervyn Frost maintains that ‘humanitarian intervention must Author: Paul Latawski, Martin A. Smith.

      The West uses ‘humanitarian intervention’ to advance economic and strategic interests. In an era where a man like Julian Assange can be mercilessly persecuted for just doing honest journalism, it takes a great deal of courage to expose the lies and misdeeds of . Military intervention for apparently humanitarian ends now carries with it a responsibility for bringing war criminals (and persons who have committed crimes against humanity) to justice. But as Michael Byers points out, “The fact is that most alleged war criminals will never appear in the dock.

    “ To what extent is Humanitarian Intervention an abandoned project? “ Humanitarian Intervention is military intervention that is carried out in pursuit of humanitarian rather than strategic objectives. This term is controversial and therefore often debated, as it is an evaluative and subjective term. The common use of the term itself is the desire to come in help to other people, however. Additional coverage of events in Kosovo and Iraq analyses the questions of humanitarian intervention and the role of the UN. Written in a clear and accessible style, setting the subject firmly in the context of world politics and the economic and cultural influences affecting it, this book remains a highly readable and invaluable resource for.


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Humanitarian intervention and the pursuit of justice Download PDF EPUB FB2

Humanitarian Intervention and the Pursuit of Justice A Pax Christi Contribution to a Contemporary Debate [van Iersel, F, Wicker, B] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Humanitarian Intervention and the Pursuit of Justice A Pax Christi Contribution to a Contemporary DebateCited by: 1.

Humanitarian intervention and the pursuit of justice: a Pax Christi contribution to a contemporary debate. The title of the book, “The Conceit of Humanitarian Intervention,” suggests that at the very least such policies are self-deceiving, in other cases perhaps deliberately meant to obfuscate.

Menon here poses the question whether, for whatever motivation, great powers can ever sufficiently master the complexity of foreign societies to truly /5(5). David Rieff, in his book "At the Point of a Gun: Democratic Dreams and Armed Intervention," considers the problematic political, legal and moral implications of humanitarian intervention.

Reiff examines responses of the international community in face of political conflicts, such as inaction in Rwanda, the late intervention in Bosnia, and the. Humanitarian Intervention in International Law: the key role of the United Nations In the realm of international affairs, humanitarian intervention has been defined as ‘a deliberate incursion into a state without its consent by some outside agency, in order to change the functioning, policies, goals of its government and achieve affects that.

During the s, humanitarian intervention seemed to promise a world in which democracy, self-determination and human rights would be privileged over national interests or imperial ambitions.

Orford provides critical readings of the narratives that accompanied such interventions and shaped legal justifications for the use of force by the Cited by:   See Fernando Teson, ‘Humanitarian Intervention: An Inquiry into Law and Morality” 5 () “[B]ecause the ultimate justification of the existence of states is the protection and enforcement of the natural rights of the citizens, a government that engages in substantial violations of human rights betrays the very purpose for which it exists and so forfeits not only its domestic legitimacy.

Humanitarian intervention is the entry of another country’s armed force into a different country with the objective of protecting the people of that country by preventing violation of human rights. The citizens of that country are protected against any acts of inhumanity.

A good example is the humanitarian interventions in Somalia. Humanitarian intervention refers to a means to prevent or stop a gross violation of human rights in a state, where the state in question is either incapable or unwilling to protect its own people, or is actively persecuting them.

It is facilitated on the basis that no state has a prerogative to allow the large-scale violation of human rights. Her research focuses on the politics of transitional justice and humanitarian intervention, and ideas about law and social order in Central Africa.

Henry Radice is a Research Fellow at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), based on the Conflict Research Programme in the Department of International : The phrase "armed humanitarian intervention" (AHI) denotes a military intervention into the jurisdiction of a state by outside forces for humanitarian purposes.

The Responsibility to Protect (RtoP) rationale was implemented in when the UN Security Council approved military intervention in Libya, and this intervention again spurred debates. Her research focuses on the politics of transitional justice and humanitarian intervention, and ideas about law and social order in Central Africa.

Henry Radice is a Research Fellow at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), based on the Conflict Research Programme in the Department of International Development.

Humanitarian intervention ultimately intended to protect human rights; however, the factors behind the success of intervention are still heavily controversial to the international community. This paper will argue that humanitarian intervention aimed at protecting human rights is a two-edged sword (Stromseth ).

Michael Walzer is Professor at the School of Social Science of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ, and editor of Dissent, a quarterly magazine of politics andWalzer graduated from Brandeis University with a B.A. in History.

From tohe studied at the University of Cambridge and completed his doctoral work at Harvard University, earning his Ph.D. "Humanitarian Intervention" Noam Chomsky. Other articles on humanitarian intervention.

Christopher Hitchens says to "Never Trust Imperialists" Richard Falk on "Intervention and Resistance" Diane F. Orentlicher on the imperative to save lives ; Carl Conetta, Charles Knight, and Robert Leavitt on the superpower unchained. The chamber of the UN Security Council, known as the Norwegian Room Founded inthe United Nations strives “to provide peace, security, and justice.” One way it tries to achieve this end is through humanitarian intervention, meaning the “post hoc rationalization for uses of force otherwise difficult to reconcile with.

Interventions: A Life in War and Peace is a memoir co-written by former Secretary-General of the United Nations and Nobel Peace Prize winner, Kofi Annan and his former adviser and speechwriter Nader Mousavizadeh.

This book focuses on the workings of the United Nations Secretariat and the conditions under which the Secretary General has to 4/5. This book places humanitarian intervention in a long-term historical context, reconsidering the doctrine's place in international society as well as the principles on which this society is based.

extent to which humanitarian intervention questions the conventional assumption that international solidarity and the pursuit of human justice are.

Humanitarian Intervention by Tonny Brems Knudsen,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. The Pursuit of International Justice. Richard J. Goldstone. Humanitarian Intervention and R2P. Simon Chesterman.

Crisis and Humanitarian Containment. Fabrice Weissman. Post-conflict Peacebuilding. Graciana del Castillo. Human Security as a Global Public Good.

Mark Raymond and Stefanie Neumeier. Part VII: Governing the. The book argues the central factors determining whether a humanitarian intervention succeeds are the objectives of the intervention and the military strategy employed by the intervening states.Human rights, humanitarian law and humanitarian intervention Rule of law, state sovereignty and international obligations are three of the most important elements that compose the world politics.Contrary to international law, international political theory had paid scant attention to the ethics of intervention and as for humanitarian intervention per se there is almost nothing.

Kant is a strong advocate of non-intervention as a maxim for peace and condoned intervention only in a situation of anarchy when a state was split into two parts. Yet several authors have tried to show that.